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The links between exercise and good dental health - sponsored post by Vivienne from No Pork Pies

Wednesday, 8 August 2012

Olympic athletes will be able to access free dental treatment during while staying at the London 2012 Olympic village – for many, this will mean access to treatments and surgeries they might not be able to receive in their home countries – such as root canals or fillings – while being in the dentist’s chair is probably not the way most would imagine spending their time at the Olympic Games, for some it will be a life-changing opportunity to access some of the best health care in the world.

Luckily for elite athletes though, they have a head start on oral hygiene – it’s been proven that exercise has a positive impact on the health of your mouth: a Saudi study in 2005 found that participants who exercised vigorously three or more times a week had a 50% reduction in the risk of periodontitis (a disease which affects the bones and ligaments supporting the teeth), when compared to those who did no exercise at all. People who exercised moderately were found to have a 33% reduction in risk.

Exercising also helps people avoid other risk factors such as diabetes – which puts you at higher risk of losing teeth and developing gum disease. Recent research has also found a link between poor dental health and heart and lung disease.

It should be motivating to know that maintaining a healthy mouth can go some way to maintain a healthy body,” says Dr Glafcos Tombolis of Ethicare Dental. “Effective removal of bacterial plaque through brushing, flossing and regular hygiene visits are not only about keeping your teeth anymore.”

Five tips for improving dental health

·        Brush your teeth thoroughly twice a day
·        Floss daily
·        Exercise regularly
·        Visit the dentist regularly
·        Avoid fizzy drinks that erode the enamel on your teeth (or drink through a straw)

A quick fitness tip you can do every day

Brushing your teeth while standing on one foot is a great way to improve your dental health and fitness at the same time.  Try brushing for three minutes on one leg in the morning and then the other leg in the evening. Alternately you can try changing your standing leg every 30 seconds for similar effects. This simple activity will help your tighten your core muscle group and improve your balance which are essential to gaining a fit body.

Vivienne Egan is a content writer at social media agency, No Pork Pies.

8 comments:

  1. great little tips, thanks! its so great that athletes visiting london will have been able to access free dentist treatment!
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  2. Dental exercise can help in lowering all the dental problems.

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  3. True. I started my routine last month.

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  4. Other studies that have connected bad oral health to elevated mortality rates suggested that underlying reason was becausen individuals who've lost all of their natural teeth may die is due to the actual fact that they must change their diets to pay for for inadequate teeth and for that reason did not have the healthy diet they need to stay healthy.
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  6. This is nice post and the tips are very beneficial for every person.
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  7. Brushing and Flossing daily is a good habbit.If any person wants their teeths and gums healthy then he/she must do this in daily routine.This will help to prevent oral problems.
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  8. Our smile is the very first thing that people notice about us.I truly like to reading your post. Thank you so much for taking the time to share such a nice information.

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